Directory

  • All About Tea: This official website takes a look at tea, beginning with its history and moving on to its cultivation and more. This is an extensive and well cited article that covers all of the basics and beneficial effects of different types of tea, along with the ingredients that cause these beneficial effects, which are known as “catechins”. There are plenty of tables and graphs that make the studies easy to understand, and there is also an abundance of links for further reading.
  • University of Maryland: Located just a stone’s throw from Washington, D.C, the capital of the United States, the University of Maryland is one of the leading public research universities south of the border. This university was home to comedian Larry David and to Google co-founder Sergey Brin, and it has one of the most heavily funded research facilities in the country. They have completed extensive work on tea, and in particular green tea, which is found in the Contemporary and Alternative Medicine Guide. This particular section looks at the health benefits, including the studies that suggest the polyphenols in green tea can help those suffering from cancer to reduce the size and the damage of their tumours.
  • Green Tea and Weight Loss: A very interesting article about a study that proved green tea can help those that are overweight to shed the pounds. One of the most interesting things about this study is that the green tea used was decaffeinated, which means that the stimulating, appetite suppressing power of caffeine was completely removed, and yet the green tea still had a significant effect.
  • National Cancer Institute: This is an American foundation that concentrates on understanding, curing and preventing cancer in the United States and worldwide. This section in particular looks at tea, and the studies completed by other research foundations. It looks at polyphenols, which contain the key ingredients catechins, and asks whether they really can prevent and even cure cancer. The foundation itself is fairly ambitious on this topic, but this provides a good overview of the current situation regarding tea and its effect on cancer, and shows that more research is needed into this very promising subject.
  • Tea Research Institute: This institute is based in Kenya, where a huge amount of black tea is cultivated and exported every year. One of their tasks is to “promote research relating to tea” and they have been doing that since 1980, when they were founded. They have actually been around longer than that, as they were known by another name before then, and all of their historical research can be found on their website, which makes for a very interesting read.
  • An Introduction to Traditional Chinese Medicine: This website takes a look at Chinese medical practices, with an emphasis on those occurring in the United States. This covers the basics and is a great starting point for those who know little or nothing about traditional Chinese medicine and want to further their understanding.
  • Herbal Teas: This is a PDF document, which can be viewed online and takes a look at herbal teas. Not only does it cover the basics of these teas, but it also looks into the best brewing methods for them before going onto discuss the health benefits of them. The document is only five pages long and for those who wish to know more about the many herbal teas out there, it is well worth a read.
  • Web MD: For many Web MD is the place they go to self-diagnose a minor condition and turn it into a major one. It is an extensive medical database that contains everything you could ever want to know. This particularly section of the website looks at tea and its impact on weight loss, along with other health benefits. In the words of the American Dietetic Association, “There doesn’t seem to be a downside to tea.”
  • Rooibos Research: This article takes a detailed look at the antioxidant and antimutagenic effects of Rooibos tea, describing everything from the background and the cultivation of this tea, to the taste and the effects that it has on the body.
  • Upasi Tea Research Foundation: Based in India, the home of many great teas, this organization conducts research into tea cultivation, discovering how they can grow the tastiest and healthiest teas, and passing that information on. They were founded many decades ago and their site contains a wealth of information about tea, from cultivation to harvesting, with plenty of interesting information regarding the health benefits and other properties of teas.
  • Pubmed Article 1: This article looks at green tea and its cancer curing potential.
  • Pubmed Article 2: A very interesting article, this one looks at the caffeine content of different types of brewed tea, which can be vital for those looking to decrease their caffeine intake whilst continuing to partake in the beneficial properties of different varieties of tea.
  • Pubmed Article 3: A study that looks at how green tea can reduce the risk of individuals getting breast cancer. The results were moderate, but the study was relatively small and this is therefore a very promising area of study that needs more research.
  • Pubmed Article 4: A very small study that researches the weight loss effects of green tea on obese people. The studies showed a small reduction in weight, but there are suggests that a bigger study, and one done on a more varied population, could provide even better results concerning the fat burning potential of green tea and other teas.
  • Pu-erh Tea: An article on About that covers Pu-erh tea, a fermented Chinese tea that is thought to have a wealth of beneficial effects, from improving overall gut health, to reducing stress and much more. This dark tea is fairly rare and can also be expensive, but it is definitely worth trying as its benefits are endless.
  • Benefits of Matcha tea: This website covers Matcha tea, a Japanese tea that is thought to have the highest antioxidants of any other substance. This tea is not brewed the way other teas are, but rather it is drunk whole, which means that you get all of the benefits of the tea leaf. The tea itself is also fresh from the leaf, which means that none of the goodness is removed through the preparation and production process.
  • White Tea: If you want to know a little more about white tea, also known as oolong tea, then this article from About is a great introduction to the subject. White tea does not have as much antioxidant content as other teas, but this is still a very beneficial tea, and one that also tastes great.
  • Dr Health: This article on Dr Health discusses the fat burning power of green tea, as well as the other beneficial aspects of this wonderful substance. It discusses what green tea can do for you, and it also contains information on how to brew the perfect cup of healthy green tea, throwing in some other ingredients that can add flavour and also provide your body with some other benefits.
  • World Medicine Institute: The World Medicine Institute conducts a detailed study of all Chinese medical practices, with things such as acupuncture covered extensively. They have a number of courses and they hold many lectures and practical sessions, and through this institute aspiring students of Chinese medicine can gain accreditations in acupuncture. It is based in Honolulu, Hawaii, and has been teaching students about the intricacies of Chinese medicine since 1970.
  • Best Health Mag: An article from this popular Canadian magazine looks at an array of herbal teas that can make you feel and look better, including lemon balm tea and chamomile tea.
  • Black Tea Benefits: This Lifehack listicle promises to tell you “ten benefits of black tea that you didn’t know about” and contains some great information about the wonderful substance. There are many that assume that green tea is the only tea which contains antioxidants, but the truth is that black tea is just as good, if not more so. Some of the benefits discussed here include the cancer preventing benefits, and the positive effects that black tea can have on oral health.
  • Rooibos Tea Benefits: This article concerns Rooibos tea, which is a naturally decaffeinated red tea. It asks whether the benefits of this tea stack up against others, such as green tea and black tea. This is a very beneficial tea, and as it has no caffeine naturally, rather than having it removed through a synthetic process, it can be perfect for those who love the taste of tea, or want to get the beneficial effects of it, but are sensitive to caffeine.
  • White Tea Guide: This is small but very interesting website that concentrates entirely on white tea and its beneficial effects. This section in particular concentrates on the antioxidant power of white tea, whilst also looking at everything else that it can do for your body.